Review: “the woman in the window” by AJ Finn (2018)

Confused.

Lost.

Agoraphobic.

Anna Fox, an online psychologist, lives in a family townhome set in Harlem, yet her family is not around. She talks to no one except her clients (on the computer), her family (on the phone), her cat, and the people who visit her: her neighbors and therapists. Due to a drastic accident a few months ago, she doesn’t leave her house; she just watches the world outside her window. During one of her drunken nights, she saw a murder happen in a house across the street. She called everyone, but no one believed her. There was blood everywhere. The body disappeared. No one had even heard of the victim. Did she hallucinate the whole thing, or did she just drink too much merlot?

the woman in the window isn’t a book you’ll ever forget. It was among the first books I read in 2018, and it’s still one of the most memorable. Since the start of the year, I’ve read 30 books, and out of those 30, “the woman in the window” has been the one that really stood out.

Under the pseudonym AJ Finn, Daniel Mallory does a brilliant job of writing a character with a mental illness with just the right amount of plot twists. This book managed to keep me reading up at all hours of the night just to see what would happen next. Also, while there weren’t always cliffhangers at the end of each chapter, if there ever was, they were worth the extra hour-or-two I stayed up past my bedtime.

Now, before we start to make assumptions on a thriller surrounding a female protagonist, this isn’t the usual story of a damsel-in-distress just trying to find the love-of-her-life. She’s actually trying to find more peace within herself, and continues to fight for her own sanity. Mallory made it a point of that, and while the summaries you can find are as vague as they should be, the characters manage to define themselves all on their own.


Characters:

First, there’s (obviously) Anna. She’s a 38-year-old therapist who lives alone in an expensive house in Manhattan. Her husband left with their 8-year-old daughter, and she only talks to them on the phone, along with all of her online clients. Other than her patients and her persistent calls to her husband to come back, her days consist of watching old black-and-white movies, people-watching, drinking 2-3 bottles of wine a day, all while having her groceries delivered, and her therapist coming for weekly “pushes” outside. So, needless to say, she’s quite content with what she goes through.

Then there’s her across-the-street neighbors, the Russells. Consisting of Ethan and his parents, they’re a mystery altogether. The Russell’s house is where she sees the murder take place, and it’s where the whole story starts to take a toll on Anna’s mind. Ethan, the 16-year-old boy who resides there, isn’t exactly a goodie-two-shoes, and neither are is parents. The Russells have always been nice to Anna, but to what extent?

Now, none of these characters are what they seem, and it gives the book the necessary twist it needs. This book is one of the few where you can’t really reveal too much of the plot without giving the whole story away, so you’ll just have to take my word on that.


A Little About the Author:

He’s kind of a piece of shit.

Want to know why?

Read this: The New Yorker


Before It Was Published:

This book definitely deserved the attention it received before it was even on the shelves. With a seven-figure sign-on bonus and movie deal, the woman in the window has been making waves in the publishing industry. The book’s ARC was reviewed by several other thriller novelists, such as Stephen King (barf), Gillian Flynn, and Paula Hawkins, which all resulted in similar forms of; “Un-put-down-able,” or ” I couldn’t stop reading.” Along with all of the praises it received, it was no surprise that it was the first debut novel in 12 years that ever made #1 on the New York Times Best Seller list (Newsweek).

Now, if that isn’t enough to make you want to go out and snag a copy, “the woman in the window” was sold over 15 million times as of October 2018, and I bought two of them.

 

Note: I’ve never actually had the urge to write a book review about a book I fell completely in love with before, so I’m going to create a new category on my blog purely for reviews. Over the next few weeks, I’ll be writing reviews about The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Annie Barrows and Mary Ann Shaffer, YOU and Hidden Bodies by Caroline Kepnes, Invisible Monsters Remix by Chuck Palahniuk, but before all of that I’ll round the 2018 off… with an overview of all the books I’ve read in 2018 (along with their ratings, and my stats for each one off of Bookly).

So! Keep up with me, so we can bring in the new year with plenty of reviews and high praises for a few brilliant authors!